Join an Air Crew in the R.A.F.
We Can Do It
Join the Women's Land Army
Man the Guns - Join the Navy
Dig On for Victory

During the war, food was not as available as it is now.
The Prime minister at the time, Winston Churchill, introduced 'Rationing'
This meant that you were only allowed a certain amount of food and you would get this,
using your ration book.
Lots of people were urged to grow their own food in their gardens and phrases such as
'Dig On for Victory' were famous.
Germany had rationing as well and their leader Adolf Hitler, who was in charge of a special army called the Nazis, was most upset.
He promised a better world and running out of food was not really a good start!
Ration books had coupons for everyday things such as meat, eggs, milk and petrol.

Buy Victory Bonds
Come into the Factories
1940's Wireless
After a blunder with the time machine, Professor McGinty found himself at the centre
of the Blitz in 1940's war torn Britain.
He witnessed how people coped and rallied together despite things such as - rationing,
air raids,evacuation, doodlebugs, the threat of gas attacks and the loss of families and friends.
The Second world war came about because the German leader at that time, Adolf Hitler, was
persecuting people and countries, and the rest of the world wasn't going to stand for it.
Most German people didn't stand for it as well.
Many of them feared what might happen to them if they stood up to him and his 'Nazi' party
and indeed some were forced to join his party, fearing for their jobs or indeed lives!
In Britain , people that couldn't fight with the army in the front lines did what they could
from home, joining 'land armies' and groups such as the 'Home Guard'.
This feeling of'everyone pulling together' between countries as well as individuals,
was to be the 'allies' strongest weapon.

Some of the activities below will help to explain some of these terms

Find the words in the following Wordsearch and ring them with your pen

Some of them are a bit tricky,
but all of the answers can be found within this activity section

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The Prime minister during the main part of the war was called Winston
Hitler led an evil group of Germans called
A huge metal car with a cannon on top is called a
Someone who could have arrested you for leaving your lights on during an air raid
Evil man who led the Nazis
When food got short the government introduced
Where the Germans lived
Where the British lived
People who fought on land
The army of the sea
The Royal Air Force is known as the
Lots of children were moved to the countryside and they were called
World _ _ _ Two
The V1 flying bomb that made a noise like a motorcycle. We called them
A shelter in your back garden for when the bombs dropped
A siren sounded and you would all take shelter during an
Soldiers who couldn't join the proper army but guarded Britain were called the

Design your own ration book.

Maybe you can pretend that you are buying things from a shop

Remember, you can only use the coupons that you have

If you run out then you will have to go hungry!

World War Two was a war fought on land in the air and at sea.
This involved the three main sections of the armed forces.

The Royal Air force, or R.A.F. as it is known, the Army, fighting on foot or
sometimes in huge armoured trucks with cannons, called Tanks.
The third military force was the Navy, fighting in battleships and trying their best to avoid
the torpedoes of German submarines or U-Boats as they called them.

For those people that couldn't join the services for whatever reason, they could
join a group called the Home Guard.
These were people that were too old or ill to fight abroad but could still 'do their bit'
for their country by guarding britain from German invaders.

Advertising played a great part in the war and posters with information on were common place.
Slogans such as 'Careless talk costs lives', Join the army!' and 'Dig On for Victory' were seen
everywhere, probably because there wasn't television to spread news like we have today.
Instead, they used to go to the cinema to watch 'newsreels' of how the war was going
and gather around the radio for any news that the war was over.

Have a go at designing your own war poster to get a message across.

You can ask your friends if they would join the armed forces after seeing your poster


During the war a lot of children from the main cities were moved out into the
countryside where it would be safer for them to stay.
These children were called 'Evacuees'.
They would all go off on trains, waving goodbye to their parents, and once at the
other end, they would line up to be chosen by people willing to look after them.
It must have been a very worrying time, to be taken away from your parents,
not knowing whether you would see them again.
Lots of them would write letters to their families to let them know how they were coping.
Try and imagine what it would have been like to be an evacuee.
If you hadn't seen the countryside before perhaps it would have been exciting.
Maybe you would have got very homesick and missed your parents.

Write a letter to your family, telling them how you are
and what you miss about the city

When the Germans came over in their planes and bombed Britain , we fought
back with giant guns based on the ground that would try and shoot them down.
These were called Anti-Aircraft Guns but came to be known as ACK ACK guns
because of the noise they made.
The first warning of a bombing attack was the wail of the air-raid sirens,
followed by the drone of the bombers engines.
Then, searchlights would light up the sky so that we could see the planes
and the anti-aircraft guns would try to shoot them down.

During these, 'air-raids', you would be expected to turn off all of your lights
and go to a shelter so that you would be safe.
If you didn't turn off your lights you could be fined by one of the air-raid wardens
that patrolled the area.

Some shelters were bank vaults or tube train stations but most people had their own shelter
in the back garden called an Anderson shelter.
This was an arch shaped shed made out of corrugated metal.
Some people would grow vegetables on top so as to disguise it from the air.
You would stay in the shelter, with bombs dropping around you, until you heard the 'all clear'
and then you could go back into your house, (if your house was still there!).
The bombs that you had to look out for were what we called 'Doodlebugs', but the
Germans called the V1 flying bomb.

Doodlebug
It had its own engine that sounded like a motorbike and you could
hear them coming from miles away.
Once the noise stopped however, the bomb was on it's way to earth
and you had better take cover.

Imagine that you are caught in an air raid and write a short story about what it was like.

Were you scared?

Were you excited?

Was your house still there when it was all over?

Were there any 'Doodlebugs'?

Why not take a look at some of the other places that Professor McGinty has visited
Maybe you could have a go at some of those activities?
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